Monday, March 26, 2018

EME2040 - Blog Post #10

In addition to reading the text for this week, I did some external (online) research on the idea of the Flipped Classroom. Frankly, I think it's a fantastic idea. I love the idea of students seeing lectures before the class and doing work based on the lecture they saw while in the class. This pretty much sums up what the flipped classroom pedagogy is all about. Essentially, students are to view pre-recorded videos of lectures before coming into the class (it's the homework assignment from the previous day). I think I would've definitely loved this method of learning when I was in high school - especially in my AP courses. Here are some links to educational videos and resources that participate in the flipped classroom:
  • https://ed.ted.com/ - Ed.ted.com allows you to take any YouTube video or any TED talk and turn it into an educational experience for your students. You can create quizzes, assignments, and other learner-specific options that are based on the video(s) you choose. 
  • https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NHVi9OIh-Bc - This website has examples of flipped classroom lessons teachers can mock their flipped classroom lessons after or possibly use for their own lessons. 
  • https://www.panopto.com/blog/7-unique-flipped-classroom-models-right/ - This site lists some different flipped classroom models you can mimic or model your lessons after. It goes into the various flipped classroom styles and why each may benefit a specific teacher. 
As for the two PPT lessons: for the first lesson, I honestly struggled through and don't feel like I did as good of a job as others probably did. I didn't like the assignment, but it wasn't because of the trouble I had with PPT; it was because of the assignment itself. I felt leaving tidbits of information on different slides was not the best way to present the material. I would've preferred to keep it more simple and have the information on fewer slides. I also don't think these assignments should have a minimum slide count. I do understand why they do - because if they didn't, people would probably turn in 1-2 slide presentations! Maybe, in the future, it'd be better to say "there is no minimum number of slides, but your presentation has to make sense as it's presented." But then, perhaps that's too subjective. Maybe add a disclaimer that "projects that have earned an A in the past were typically at least 10 slides long" or something. I'm not sure, but it just feels like adding a minimum number makes people "fluff" their slides up. I'd rather see quality over quantity. 

Here's a screenshot of PPT assignment #1: 


Here's a screenshot of PPT assignment #2:



Probably the only thing I found super interesting from the instructor's blog post was how there are SO MANY "open source" options out there. I wonder if this is helping us or hurting us as a society? On the one hand, it seems pretty obvious how it would help us. On the other hand, what about those trying to make a little extra cash from their resources? The number of free items out there would certainly undercut those trying to make sales. I also had to laugh at the DID example the instructor gave (the one that asked the students right off the bat to define hyperbole/paradox and yet, that was one of the end-of-the-lesson goals, too)! Oh, what a ...paradox! Ha! There's the definition of paradox right there! I wonder if that instructor ever caught onto that? :) 

2 comments:

  1. Hi Ashley! I really enjoyed reading you post this week. I saw you mentioned you would have loved to have this type of classroom in AP courses, and I had friends who did! Their AP Biology teacher had a flipped classroom, and they really liked the idea because they were able to ask more questions while in class, do experiments, and they got more from the material. I didn’t really struggle with the PowerPoint assignment like you said you were, but I am a wordy person, so I need more slides. Not everyone is wordy, so I get where you’re coming from with the slide limit. I was also surprised about the number of open source websites, and I thought it was interesting to see what everyone else picked! Look forward to reading next week!

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  2. Hi Tasha! I really enjoyed reading you post this week. I saw you mentioned you would have loved to have this type of classroom in AP courses, and I had friends who did! Their AP Biology teacher had a flipped classroom, and they really liked the idea because they were able to ask more questions while in class, do experiments, and they got more from the material. I didn’t really struggle with the PowerPoint assignment like you said you were, but I am a wordy person, so I need more slides. Not everyone is wordy, so I get where you’re coming from with the slide limit. I was also surprised about the number of open source websites, and I thought it was interesting to see what everyone else picked! Look forward to reading next week!

    ReplyDelete

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